Intraocular lenses

 

Intraocular lenses (IOL) are artificial lenses, designed to replace the natural lens of the eye. There are a few different types of intraocular lenses used at the Sydney Eye Clinic.  Dr Ilan Sebban can advise which lens will work best for your condition.

 

Types of intraocular lenses

Monofocal IOL

Monofocal intraocular lenses provide patients with a set focal point, usually for distance vision.

Common types of monofocal intraocular lenses used at the Sydney Eye Clinic include the Tecnis CL, Rayner Toric, Asphina and Torbi.

Dr Ilan Sebban can advise you on which lens is right for your eyes. 

 

Multifocal IOL

Multifocal intraocular lenses provide patients with multiple focal points by dividing the light and focusing it on more than one point, providing a greater range of sight.  Multifocal lenses can further reduce the need for glasses or contact lenses after surgery in some cases.

Common types of multifocal intraocular lenses used at the Sydney Eye Clinic include the Rezoom multifocal lens, Tecnis multifocal lens, Acri.Lisa multifocal lens, the Rayner M-Flex Multifocal IOL and the Zeiss trifocal lens.

Dr Ilan Sebban can advise you on which lens is right for your eyes. 

 

Piggyback lenses

Every patient is different and every eye will heal differently.  In some rare cases, a minor adjustment made be required after an intraocular lens implant. 

Piggyback lenses are enhancement lenses which work with other intraocular lenses.  They can be safely and effectively added to your original lens implant, which means patients avoid the unnecessary discomfort and inconvenience of having the original intraocular lens removed.  Piggyback lenses are exceptionally thin and are custom matched for your eyes.

Dr Ilan Sebban can advise you on which lens is right for your eyes. 



Any surgical or invasive procedure carries risks. Before proceeding, you should seek a second opinion from an 
appropriately qualified health practitioner. Read more about the  Consent Information for Intraocular lens surgery.

‹ Back